Dendrobium pachyphyllum in bloom

I have had this little mounted miniature Dendrobium for 10 months, so this is the first time that it has bloomed for me.  There are about 20 flowers that are smaller than a penny.

Dendrobium pachyphyllum
Dendrobium pachyphyllum

When you look at them up close you can see how neat they are, even though they are tiny.  They are also really pleasantly fragrant.  Christie said they smelled a little like honeysuckle.  I was thinking I smelled some mint.

Dendrobium pachyphyllum bloom up close
Dendrobium pachyphyllum bloom up close

Trip Report: OKC Orchid Show, part 2

I have already posted about a dozen photos from the OKC Orchid Show, so check those out, if you haven’t already.

Blc. Waianea Leopard 'Ching Hua'
Blc. Waianea Leopard 'Ching Hua'

Just like there are “Vanda People” and “Slipper People,” there are “Catt(leya) People.” I have to say that I am not one of those people. Cattleyas tend to be large flowers that are kind of frilly like bearded Irises, and they just don’t appeal to me that much. That being said, I do enjoy some Cattleyas, mainly the spotted ones, and I am posting photos of those.

Cattleya Green Emerald 'Emerald Queen'
Cattleya Green Emerald 'Queen'
Cattleya schilleriana
Cattleya schilleriana

Brassavola nodosa is a popular orchid that is known for its fragrance, but only in the evening. There are several cultivars or hybrids made with this species, including Brassavola Little Stars (below).

Brassavola Little Stars
Brassavola Little Stars

By far the coolest thing I saw at the show was the Dendrobium Black Spider. I haven’t ever seen a black Dendrobium, or really anything close to this dark. When I was helping tear down the exhibits on Sunday I complimented the grower on her black Dendrobium and she kind of shrugged and didn’t say anything. I guess some people are less interested in discussing their plants than others. Or maybe she was just tired from the weekend…

Dendrobium Black Spider
Dendrobium Black Spider

I don’t know whether Encyclias are more popular around here than I had previously thought, or if I am just paying more attention to them this year, or if this is just a really good blooming year for them. Whatever the case, there were many Encyclias on display in Wichita and in Oklahoma City.

Encyclia alata
Encyclia alata

The plant above is the species Encyclia alata and the plant below is a primary hybrid of Encyclia alata and Encyclia mooreana. Both are awesome plants.

Encyclia alata x mooreana
Encyclia alata x mooreana

The large primary hybrid above and the species below were both featured as the centerpiece of their respective displays. In fact, that photo above was taken before any of the rest of the plants were in place. (I wouldn’t have been able to get such a picture of just this plant once the exhibit was assembled, because many other plants were crowded around it.

Encyclia alatum majus
Encyclia alatum majus

Don’t you just love the colors of the Encyclia hanburii (below)?  Just awesome!

Encyclia hanburii
Encyclia hanburii

The odd ball Encyclia at the show is one of those that keeps getting shuffled around taxonomically.  It has been in several different genera, including Encyclia, Anacheilium, Prosthechea and, of course, the original catch-all genus Epidendrum.  According to orchidspecies.com, which is what I normally consider the authority, it is currently classified as Anacheilium radiata.

Encylia radiata
Encylia radiata

I hope you enjoyed your virtual participation in the Oklahoma Orchid Society show.  If you’re in the area, you should try to attend in person next year.  We always have our show on Mother’s Day weekend at the Will Rogers Garden Center in Oklahoma City.

Trip Report: OKC Orchid Show, part 1

For the last four or five years I have attended the Oklahoma Orchid Society (OOS) show on Mother’s Day weekend in Oklahoma City. Last year when I attended I decided to go ahead and join the OOS. So this year, when it was time to put on the show, I found myself on the other side, showing up on Friday to help set up the show before it was open to the public.

Brian Truong's (Okie Orchids) exhibit
Brian Truong's (a.k.a. Okie Orchids) exhibit

It was a very busy weekend, including three graduation ceremonies and two Mother’s Day meals. I took off work on Friday to help setup the OOS exhibit and to help the vendors bring in their plants. It was a fun experience and I understand the whole process much better now. Christie joined me with the setup and was the official label maker for the plants displayed in the OOS exhibit.

Unknown jewel orchid
Unknown jewel orchid

This time around I entered three of my own orchids, including the jewel orchid pictured below, which got a 2nd place ribbon. Plants are classified in different categories and my jewel orchid would have been competing against the plant pictured above, which received a first place ribbon. My other two orchids both received first place ribbons, so I am now 5 for 5 with the plants I have shown in orchid shows!

Sarcoglottis sceptrodes
Sarcoglottis sceptrodes

The Stelis pictured below was on display in our OOS exhibit. It is a neat little plant, named after one of the guys who had that gigantic exhibit in Wichita a couple of weeks ago.

Stelis scabrata 'Bryon'
Stelis scabrata 'Bryon'

There were two little Phalaenopsis-type orchids in our exhibit that had really nice little flowers (both pictured below).

Nice yellow Phalaenopsis
Nice yellow Phalaenopsis
Dtps. Little Gem Stripe
Dtps. Little Gem Stripe

Sarah Pratt of Timbucktoo Orchids came down from the Wichita area and set up both a nice exhibit and had a vendor table. Her exhibit included a big Stanhopea embreei (below) which was still in bud when we helped her unload, but had opened on Sunday when I was helping tear down. I hope that it opened on Saturday when the judges made their rounds and the bulk of the crowd was there.

Stanhopea embreei
Stanhopea embreei
Stanhopea embreei, closeup of flowers
Stanhopea embreei, closeup of flowers

I know I have shown Grammatophyllum pictures several times, but it is such a cool plant, that I just have to show them off again (below). This plant gets gigantic, but that won’t stop me from growing one some day.

Grammatophyllum scriptum
Grammatophyllum scriptum

In Wichita I was discussing orchids with my friends and learned that the correct pronunciation of the genus Coelogyne is “suh-LODGE-uh-nee.” I won’t try and figure out how I was saying it in my head up until then, but it was significantly different enough that I didn’t even know what plant Steve was talking about when he was saying this name. Later when we were by the labeled plant it suddenly dawned on me that that was the name Steve had been saying earlier.

Coelogyne speciosa
Coelogyne speciosa

Both Catasetums and Coelogyne tend to grow from large pseudobulbs with pendulous or semi-upright spikes of flowers. I haven’t grown either of these genera before. There were a couple of nice specimens at the show.

Catasetum tenebrosum
Catasetum tenebrosum

There was a really interesting intergeneric hybrid (I think) orchid for sale from Orchid Konnection. I couldn’t find a tag on either of the two plants for sale, but Christie and I both stopped and noticed this one. It was just very unusual colors and markings for this type of orchid (below). It remains a mystery for now… [Update: The plant has been tentatively identified by commenter Peaches!]

Really neat plant for sale from Orchid Konnection
Really neat plant for sale from Orchid Konnection, probably Bllra. Patricia McCully 'Pacific Matriarch'

I have some more photos to share, so stay tuned for the second part.

My first Pinellias

Last year, Derek got some great photos of his Pinellia tripartita in bloom, including one photo which was featured in the International Aroid Society calendar.  This plant is known to spread like crazy, since it offsets from the tubers, produces viable seed and also form bulbils at base of the petioles.  He shared some of his bulb offsets with me and then later some seeds, too.  I planted these in pots and kept them in my greenhouse over the winter.  The seeds sproutedshortly after I got them and stayed about the same over the winter.  The bulb offsets were dormant when I potted them up, but they have come up now and produced an inflorescence, which now has berries (infructescence).

Pinellia tripartita
Pinellia tripartita

I haven’t planted this one outside yet and it performed so well for me in the pot this year that I don’t know if I will.  However, since I have so many seeds, it looks like I could easily have enough to plant some outdoors and keep some in pots, which would be nice.

Pinellia tripartita infructescence
Pinellia tripartita infructescence

At the IAS show in September I picked up a Pinellia pedatisecta,  which Dr. Croat had pulled up from his own yard.  I planted that one outside and it has also come up and produced an inflorescence, and has now set berries.  Both of these plants are hardy in zones 5-10, so they shouldn’t have any trouble with the extreme heat or freezing temperatures of my zone.

Pinellia pedatisecta
Pinellia pedatisecta
Pinellia pedatisecta infructescence
Pinellia pedatisecta infructescence

At the Wichita orchid show I traded some plants with friends that I was meeting there.  I got a nice clump of Pinellia ternata from Steve and have planted those beside the Pinellia pedatisecta beside the greenhouse.  This plant also produces bulbils at the base of the petioles, so it spreads in a variety of methods.

Pinellia ternata
Pinellia ternata

I know this plant doesn’t look great right now, having just been transplanted, but it should perk up given a little time.  Hopefully next year the clump is just as big and has a couple of blooms to go along with it.  This little strip of garden along the back side of my greenhouse is becoming the hardy aroids area.

Project: Homemade orchid basket

I made a couple of orchid baskets out of sticks and wire last year.  Those are cool, but they are not quite as sturdy and permanent as I was wanting.  They tend to come apart pretty easily.  I was looking at some orchid forums online and came across some similar baskets that were constructed a little differently, so I decided to give it a try.

Completed orchid basket, ready for a plant
Completed orchid basket, ready for a plant

First, I needed to get some sticks with a larger diameter and then use my table saw to cut them lengthwise, yielding a smooth edge.  Then I attach these with small nails to upward supports in each corner.  The bottom was a little more improvised, using paint stir sticks.

Stanhopea oculata in new orchid basket
Stanhopea oculata in new orchid basket

I lined the basket with a coconut fiber liner and then potted a Stanhopea oculata in sphagnum moss.